10 Comments


  1. ·

    I found your site on google blog search and read a few of your other posts. Keep up the good work. Just added your RSS feed to my feed reader. Look forward to reading more from you.

    Karen Halls

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  2. ·

    This is so true, what you say, and I have very recent experience with this. I have been holed up in my house, having recently moved my office to home. I have been at home, sick, and I left yesterday to run an errand. It was bright, fresh and strange outside. I was not twittering, I was not blogging, I was not working on work. I was functioning as a human being. We need to remind ourselves to just be ourselves and be true to who we are. We can make technology conform to us rather than the reverse, I think. PS – this is gorgeous, what you have, perfect look-and-feel and nice to have ‘met’ you. Best of wishes in your endeavors! – coffeebreath on twitter

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    There is a line in the Paul Auster novel, New York Trilogy, which goes something like, “he realised that you’re only ever alive when somebody is watching you”.

    I think for most people they feel more “alive” when they receive a text message, email or personal message. It’s like the world hasn’t forgotten them or something, although personally, I’d rather be at the pub talking to my friends than chatting to people online.

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  4. Kat
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    @sharon Thanks! And you’re right–it’s important to master the technology, or the technology will become your master.

    @chris Your Auster quote reminds me of the Nicole Kidman movie To Die For, where she was obsessed with being on television. There’s definitely a certain validation that comes with that intentional contact.

    I’d love to say that I prefer talking in the real world, but the truth is, I’m much more introverted offline. 🙂 I like having the opportunity to edit before hitting “submit”–my mouth doesn’t seem to come with that functionality.

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  7. ·

    Excellent! I love seeing TA used on social media. What fascinates me is the mediated stroke — the sort of dis-embedded stroke that is solicited and obtained indirectly by means of online interaction. For example, that strokes come after the fact — not when I interact but later, when my contribution is discovered. These are indirect strokes — because they have no affect, are not given me by a person, face to face. They must have a different quality — one that sometimes can be misleading (as in people who count followers as “strokes”). And the fact that they cannot bind us to one another must also have implications… Keep it up!

    Adrian

    Adrian Chans last story..Social media’s first law: user centric design

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  8. Kat
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    Adrian -Thanks for digging up this post and providing one of the most interesting comments I’ve received.

    I suppose that’s one of those “mediated strokes” you’re talking about. 🙂

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  9. ·

    There is a line in the Paul Auster novel, New York Trilogy, which goes something like, “he realised that you’re only ever alive when somebody is watching you”.

    I think for most people they feel more “alive” when they receive a text message, email or personal message. It’s like the world hasn’t forgotten them or something, although personally, I’d rather be at the pub talking to my friends than chatting to people online.

    Reply

  10. ·

    Heya there, I’m not familiar with ‘Transactional Analysis’ but it sounds interesting enough, I’ll definitely take a close look at it to see how much further it can be applied in this context. I wrote a similar post about Internet and came at it from another angel using research on the topic and so on, you might find it useful, http://www.renaldobernard.com/blog/internet-addiction-really/
    .-= Renaldo Bernard´s last blog ..Using Social Media ‘Right’ in the Caribbean and Elsewhere =-.

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